Lifelong Learning

Lifelong learning.

This phrase seems to have lost its novelty value of late; five years ago education seemed to be aiming for this. The problem, from a governmental perspective, was that this idea seemingly got in the way of standards. As with most educational policy, if it’s not measurable it’s not worth bothering with. And as all expert educators will know, there’s not a unit of measurement that will calculate how ‘lifelong’ a bit of learning was.

There was and still is arguments that lifelong learning or ‘soft skills’ are woolly (again this notion results in the fact that these soft skills cannot be measured)

It could be argued that these skills/habits should be woolly. Life is woolly. If someone asked you how your day has been, the answer is rarely “well according to my ‘afternoon index calculation’ it’s about 5.5 which means I’ve added value when compared with this time last year;” life is not like that!

When planning for lifelong learning in the classroom it is important to remember that ‘lifelong’ begins NOW, not when children become adults; or as Sir Ken Robinson puts it “A 3 year old is not half a 6 year old”; from a different perspective a 40 year old is not a 50 year old in waiting and so on…

We use Guy Claxton four Rs as basis for lifelong learning in our classrooms, over time this has helped pupils become happy, independent and creative learners; statistically were can’t  prove what we see, day in, day out in our classrooms and whilst the ‘standards’ are indeed high, this would be the wrong unit of measurement; so you’ll just have to take our word for it!

The Thought Weavers

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3 thoughts on “Lifelong Learning

  1. “Life is woolly. If someone asked you how your day has been, the answer is rarely “well according to my ‘afternoon index calculation’ it’s about 5.5 which means I’ve added value when compared with this time last year;” life is not like that!” BRILLIANT!

  2. I’m definitely a huge supporter of lifelong learning. This post said it well ‘…lifelong learning begins NOW, not when children become adults’. It is our responsibility as teachers to instill life long learning in our students in order to prepare them for the world ahead.

  3. I champion the following conceptual model which is a great resource for lifelong learning, personal and group reflection introduced through a website and blog –

    http://hodges-model.blogspot.com/

    Originally created in the UK by Brian E Hodges (Ret.) at Manchester Metropolitan University – Hodges’ Health Career – Care Domains – Model [h2cm]

    http://www.p-jones.demon.co.uk/

    – can help map health, social care and OTHER issues, problems and solutions. The model takes a situated and multi-contextual view across four knowledge domains:

    * Interpersonal;
    * Sociological;
    * Empirical;
    * Political.

    Our links pages cover each care (knowledge) domain e.g. SOCIOLOGY:

    http://www.p-jones.demon.co.uk/links3.htm

    SCIENCES:

    http://www.p-jones.demon.co.uk/linksTwo.htm

    The blog includes a bibliography and growing archive of posts. I would be pleased to help people apply / write about the model. If anyone would like a copy of a paper let me know.

    In Feb. the model was presented in Colombia at a nursing theory conference and in London – reflective practice. A poster on how the model can support health literacy will be presented in June.

    Best regards,

    Peter Jones
    RMN, RGN, CPN(Cert), PGCE, PG(Dip) COPE, BA (Hons.).
    Community Mental Health Nurse for Older Adults,
    Independent Scholar and Informatics Specialist
    Lancashire, UK
    h2cm: help 2C more – help 2 listen – help 2 care

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